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Edge effects on N2O, NO and CH4 fluxes in two temperate forests

Edge effects on N2O, NO and CH4 fluxes in two temperate forests
chair:

Remy E, Gasche R, Kiese R, Wuyts K, Verheyen K, Boeckx P

place:

Science of the Total Environment 575, 1150-1155. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2016.09.196

Date: 2017

Edge effects on N2O, NO and CH4 fluxes in two temperate forests

Science of the Total Environment
Science of the Total Environment

Forest ecosystems may act as sinks or sources of nitrogen (N) and carbon (C) compounds, such as the climate relevant trace gases nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO) and methane (CH4). Forest edges, which catch more atmospheric deposition, have become important features in European landscapes and elsewhere. Here, we implemented a fully automated measuring system, comprising static and dynamic measuring chambers determining N2O, NO and CH4 fluxes along an edge-to-interior transect in an oak (Q. robur) and a pine (P. nigra) forest in northern Belgium. Each forest was monitored during a 2-week measurement campaign with continuous measurements every 2 h. NO emissions were 9-fold higher than N2O emissions. The fluxes of NO and CH4 differed between forest edge and interior, but not for N2O. This edge effect was more pronounced in the oak than in the pine forest. In the oak forest, edges emitted less NO (on average 60%) and took up more CH4 (on average 177%). This suggests that landscape structure can play a role in the atmospheric budgets of these climate relevant trace gases. Soil moisture variation between forest edge and interior was a key variable explaining the magnitude of NO and CH4 fluxes in our measurement campaign. To better understand the environmental impact of N and C trace gas fluxes from forest edges, additional and long-term measurements in other forest edges are required.